First Aid and Repair Kit (108 g)

Over the years I have fine-tuned my first aid and repair kits to suit my needs. At first and for many years I packed separate kits. The last six months or so both kits have transformed into one.

I found that by reducing the kits into one that it is easier for me to locate what I need when an emergency presents itself. I always pack my first aid/repair kit in the outer net of my back pack so it is easy and handy to retrieve. I made a mistake of previously packing it in the main compartment. This is not practical for fast deployment under emergency situations. Along with practicing lightweight hiking principles the simplicity of a single kit appeals to me too.

My Previous First Aid Kit (this is not my current first aid kit)

FIRST AID KIT 84 grams

Before the fusion into a single entity the first-aid kit above consisted of the below items and weighed 84 grams with the bag.

  • plasters
  • electrolyte rehydration tablets
  • Imolope relieves diarrhoea
  • gauze roller bandage
  • tick remover
  • Paracetamol 500 mg
  • Ibuprofen 200 mg
  • 4 safety pins
  • needle
  • Swiss Army Knife Classic SD including scissors & tweezers
  • adhesive tape (angel skin)
  • cleansing wipes
  • gauze dressings
  • Tread Lite Gear Cuben Fiber First Aid Pouch

My Previous Repair Kit (this is not my current repair kit)

REPAIR KIT 46 grams

Before the fusion into a single entity the repair kit above consisted of the below items and weighed 46 grams with the HMG cuben stuff sack nano.

  • cuben repair kit for tent
  • HMG repair kit for cuben backpack
  • Tear-Aid Patch for clothes
  • HMG cuben stuff sack nano
  • 5m cord
  • cleansing wipes
  • repair kit for sleeping pad
  • duct tape

My Current First Aid & Repair Kit combined (108 g)

Tread Lite Gear Cuben Fiber Pouch
The single kit shown above now consists of the below items weighing just 108 grams and is contained in the Tread Lite Gear Cuben Fiber Pouch.
  • plasters
  • gauze roller bandage
  • gauze dressings
  • adhesive tape (angel skin)
  • needle
  • cleansing wipes
  • Paracetamol 500 mg
  • Ibuprofen 200 mg
  • Imolope relieves diarrhoea
  • Postafen 25 mg against travel sickness
  • electrolyte rehydration tablets
  • tick remover
  • 4 safety pins
  • cuben repair kit for tent
  • Tear-Aid Patch for clothes
  • HMG repair kit for cuben backpack
  • repair kit for sleeping pad
  • duct tape
  • spare Bic lighter
  • Tread Lite Gear Cuben Fiber Pouch
my first aid & repair kit 108 grams

I always carry a buff and a cotton handkerchief (yes – I’m an old codger). I normally hike almost always alone and not in groups. I’m not responsible for other hikers, so I only need to take care of myself. I believe that if I need more than the gauze dressings and the gauze roller bandage then I can use my buff or handkerchief to treat a larger wound in an emergency situation.

Items that I have used on trail are:

  • plasters
  • cleansing wipes
  • Paracetamol 500 mg
  • Imolope relieves diarrhoea
  • Postafen 25 mg against travel sickness
  • adhesive tape (angel skin)
  • needle
  • tick remover
  • Tear-Aid Patch for clothes
  • duct tape

The plasters have been used for small cuts and abrasions; the normal stuff. I fell once on ice and cut up my hand pretty band but the plasters were enough to treat the wounds.

I use the cleansing wipes if I get a foot blister which has not happened since I have used  toe socks. For blister treatment I clean the area first, then puncture the blister with the needle that I also have wiped clean with the alcohol wipe. I use the sheath that the needle is kept in to roll along the skin and push out all the fluids from the sore. Then I just apply a small amount of “angel skin” as the tape is known as in the trade. That’s it, this is all you need to do for blister treatment. This method was shown to me by St Johns Ambulance volunteers.

I had to use the Postafen when I was on a train to Stockholm last year. When I walked up  and down to the food carriage through the train I became sick. My stomach can’t handle mush swinging around.

On a hike in Sweden once I had to be “rescued” by my family as I suffered from severe case of heat stroke. I started feeling ill and very weak and then came some violent retching. I had to take several breaks and lie down on my sleeping mat for half hour breaks before I could continue. I would walk about 1 km and then sick and then rest 1/2 hour before I could move on. I did this until I could not go on. I simply had no energy left. Since then the electrolyte rehydration tablets come with me on every hike.

My “puffy” jacket had to be repaired once with Tear-Aid. A flying spark from a fire burnt a nice hole in it exposing the down. When I returned home again I applied a matching colour patch and now it is good to go.

The only time that I have used duct tape was last year when I secured my backpack for the flight home from Kiruna in Sweden on my 2018 Kungsleden adventure.

The Swiss Army Knife is now stored together with my kitchen kit. I have never used the 5 meters of cord so I don’t pack it any more. I also have some cord tied to the top of my inner in all my shelters to hang items from. So if I do require any cord then I could use this.

Photos here on Flickr


Disclosure:
Product(s) discussed in this article were either purchased by Brian Outdoors from a retailer or otherwise provided by the manufacturer at a discount/donation with no obligation to provide media coverage or a product review to the manufacturer(s). I do not accept compensation or donated product in exchange for guaranteed media placement or product review coverage without clearly denoting such coverage as an “ADVERTISEMENT” or “SPONSORED CONTENT.”

3 Replies to “First Aid and Repair Kit (108 g)”

    1. Yes, I remember that we talked about them once before and that you said that you use them too. I did 28 km last Friday and not one foot issue. Just love those socks. I have been using them for just over one year now, although not on my winter hikes. I won’t go back to anything else now. I can’t believe how great they are.

      Like

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